Intra-colic textilome
Robleh Hassan, Jesus Cabrera
The Pan African Medical Journal. ;28:278. doi:10.11604/pamj..28.278.13616

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Intra-colic textilome

Robleh Hassan, Jesus Cabrera
Pan Afr Med J. 2017; 28:278. doi:10.11604/pamj.2017.28.278.13616. Published 29 Nov 2017



The textilome or still called gossybipoma is a very rare but well known and not insignificant post-operative grave lesion in the abdominal and gynecological surgery. It is a foreign body compound of gauze or surgical drape omitted in the operation site. The difficulties of diagnosis delay generally the discovery of abdominal textilome. The clinicals symptoms are: chronic disorders of the transit in sub-occlusive or occlusive syndromes. Erect Abdominal X-ray has little contributory in the diagnosis, but the ultrasound remains more reliable. Abdominal CT Scan allows a precise topographic diagnosis; certain teams propose explorations by MRI. We report a case of intra-colic textilome (sigmoïde), presenting acute abdomen in forme of an occlusive syndrome in patient who was operated 3 years ago for uterine fibroid.


Corresponding author:
Robleh Hassan, General Surgery Department, Balbala Hospital, Djibouti
robleh_h@hotmail.com

©Robleh Hassan et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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