Home | Volume 47 | Article number 140

Images in clinical medicine

Rosette cataract thirty years after trauma

Rosette cataract thirty years after trauma

Amine Zahaf1,2,&, Nada Bouallegui1,2

 

1Department of Ophthalmology, Internal Security Forces Hospital, 29 Rue Tahar Ben Achour, La Marsa, Tunis, Tunisia, 2Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar, 15 Rue Djebel Lakhdhar, Tunis, Tunisia

 

 

&Corresponding author
Amine Zahaf, Department of Ophthalmology, Internal Security Forces Hospital, 29 Rue Tahar Ben Achour, La Marsa, Tunis, Tunisia

 

 

Image in medicine    Down

A 48-year-old healthy woman presented with complaints of diminution of vision in the right eye (OD) for the last 8 months. She reported having undergone trauma to her OD at the age of 18. Visual acuity was 20/40 OD. The slit lamp biomicroscopy of the OD showed a central endonucleus cataract with white axial opacities organized in a distinctive Rosette pattern, forming six distinct quadrangular 'petals´ (yellow arrow) and a transparent outer epinuclear shell (blue arrow). Notably, the absence of zonular rupture differentiates it from a subluxated cataract. Cataracts with a Rosette or stellate-shaped appearance are typically seen in blunt or ocular injuries. Prior to surgery, patients must be checked for associated lesions, especially zonular dehiscence.

 

 



Figure 1: central endonucleus cataract with white axial opacities organized in a distinctive Rosette pattern, forming six distinct quadrangular ´petals´ (yellow arrow) and transparent outer epinuclear shell without zonular dehiscence (blue arrow)