Images in clinical medicine | Volume 40, Article 107, 18 Oct 2021 | 10.11604/pamj.2021.40.107.26779

Nevus pigmentosus et pilosus

Supraja Nagarathinam, Krishna Prasanth Baalann

Corresponding author: Supraja Nagarathinam, Department of Community Medicine, Sree Balaji Medical College and Hospital, Bharath Institute of Higher Education and Research, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Received: 01 Nov 2020 - Accepted: 11 Nov 2020 - Published: 18 Oct 2021

Domain: Pediatric oncology,Cosmetic surgery,Public health

Keywords: Congenital melanocytic nevus, melanoma, dermabrasion

©Supraja Nagarathinam et al. Pan African Medical Journal (ISSN: 1937-8688). This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution International 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Cite this article: Supraja Nagarathinam et al. Nevus pigmentosus et pilosus. Pan African Medical Journal. 2021;40:107. [doi: 10.11604/pamj.2021.40.107.26779]

Available online at: https://www.panafrican-med-journal.com/content/article/40/107/full

Home | Volume 40 | Article number 107

Images in clinical medicine

Nevus pigmentosus et pilosus

Nevus pigmentosus et pilosus

Supraja Nagarathinam1,&, Krishna Prasanth Baalann1

 

1Department of Community Medicine, Sree Balaji Medical College and Hospital, Bharath Institute of Higher Education and Research, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

 

 

&Corresponding author
Supraja Nagarathinam, Department of Community Medicine, Sree Balaji Medical College and Hospital, Bharath Institute of Higher Education and Research, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

 

 

Abstract

Congenital melanocytic nevus (CMN) is a proliferation of melanocytes that presents at birth or shortly after birth as light brown to black patches or plaques, covering any part of the body occasionally exhibiting hypertrichosis. The estimated prevalence of such large forms is 0.002% of the births, resulting from mutations of genes coding for NRAS and KRAS proteins, usually during the first twelve weeks of pregnancy. Giant CMN also known as "bathing trunk nevus," "giant hairy nevus", and "nevus pigmentosus et pilosus" has highest potential to turn into malignant melanoma. We present a case of a 7 year old boy who came to our clinic with complaints of itching over his left shoulder and back for 4 months duration. He gave history of black patches on those areas since birth that gradually grew in size and attained the current presentation. On examination, well demarcated black patches were noted over his left shoulder, arm, trunk (A) and extending from nape of the neck and the entire back with excessive hair growth (B). A diagnosis of congenital melanocytic nevus was established and since it could potentially evolve into a melanoma, prophylactic surgery with skin grafting was suggested but the patient's parents refused. Hence dermabrasion was done to lighten the dark pigmentation and reduce hair growth within nevi. Parents were counselled about complications of CMN and advised to follow up with a dermatologist regularly. Clinicians should scrupulously examine the child to facilitate timely surgical intervention thereby reducing morbidity and mortality associated with this condition.

Figure 1: A) well demarcated black patches over left shoulder and trunk; B) black pigmentation extending from nape of neck to lower back with hypertrichosis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Images in clinical medicine

Nevus pigmentosus et pilosus

Images in clinical medicine

Nevus pigmentosus et pilosus

Images in clinical medicine

Nevus pigmentosus et pilosus

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Congenital melanocytic nevus

Melanoma

Dermabrasion

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