Images in clinical medicine | Volume 39, Article 247, 18 Aug 2021 | 10.11604/pamj.2021.39.247.30459

High-rising epiglottis, an uncommon cause of dysphagia

Husam Bader, Alexandra Rubin

Corresponding author: Husam Bader, Monmouth Medical Center, New Jersey, United States of America

Received: 21 Jun 2021 - Accepted: 05 Aug 2021 - Published: 18 Aug 2021

Domain: Gastroenterology,Internal medicine,Otolaryngology (ENT)

Keywords: Dysphagia, high-rising epiglottis, internal medicine

©Husam Bader et al. Pan African Medical Journal (ISSN: 1937-8688). This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution International 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Cite this article: Husam Bader et al. High-rising epiglottis, an uncommon cause of dysphagia. Pan African Medical Journal. 2021;39:247. [doi: 10.11604/pamj.2021.39.247.30459]

Available online at: https://www.panafrican-med-journal.com/content/article/39/247/full

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Images in clinical medicine

High-rising epiglottis, an uncommon cause of dysphagia

High-rising epiglottis, an uncommon cause of dysphagia

Husam Bader1,&, Alexandra Rubin2

 

1Monmouth Medical Center, New jersey, United States of America, 2Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Jersey, United States of America

 

 

&Corresponding author
Husam Bader, Monmouth Medical Center, New Jersey, United States of America

 

 

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A 43-year-old female, 147cm in height, with a medical history significant for sickle cell disease, chronic pain with chronic opioid dependence and diastolic congestive heart failure. Patient was hospitalized for decompensated congestive heart failure and new onset of anasarca. Additionally, the patient described a sensation of “fullness” in her throat for over a decade, but denied other gastrointestinal symptoms including weight loss, choking, nausea or vomiting. Physical examination revealed a “high-rising epiglottis”. There was no history of epiglottitis. Further work-up of the dysphagia was otherwise unremarkable. A high-rising epiglottis is a benign entity that is rarely described in adults, particularly those with short stature and can result in dysphagia.

 

 

Figure 1: high-rising epiglottis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Images in clinical medicine

High-rising epiglottis, an uncommon cause of dysphagia

Images in clinical medicine

High-rising epiglottis, an uncommon cause of dysphagia

Images in clinical medicine

High-rising epiglottis, an uncommon cause of dysphagia

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Dysphagia

High-rising epiglottis

Internal medicine

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