Images in clinical medicine | Volume 37, Article 322, 07 Dec 2020 | 10.11604/pamj.2020.37.322.20991

Erysipelas complicating impetigo

Khadija Elboukhari, Mohammed Ouadoud

Corresponding author: Khadija Elboukhari, Service de Dermatologie, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Fès, Fès, Maroc

Received: 15 Nov 2019 - Accepted: 29 Oct 2020 - Published: 07 Dec 2020

Domain: Public Health informatics,Dermatology,Infectious disease

Keywords: Erysipelas, impetigo, children

©Khadija Elboukhari et al. Pan African Medical Journal (ISSN: 1937-8688). This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution International 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Cite this article: Khadija Elboukhari et al. Erysipelas complicating impetigo. Pan African Medical Journal. 2020;37:322. [doi: 10.11604/pamj.2020.37.322.20991]

Available online at: https://www.panafrican-med-journal.com/content/article/37/322/full

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Images in clinical medicine

Erysipelas complicating impetigo

Erysipelas complicating impetigo

Khadija Elboukhari1,&, Mohammed Ouadoud1

 

1Service de Dermatologie, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Fès, Fès, Maroc

 

 

&Corresponding author
Khadija Elboukhari, Service de Dermatologie, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Fès, Fès, Maroc

 

 

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Erysipelas is an infectious dermo-hypodermitis due to group A beta-haemolytic streptococcus. It is common in adults. Obesity as well as lymphedema are major risk factors. These conditions are not frequent in children, hence erysipelas is rare during childhood. We here report the case of two children, aged 11 and 9 years respectively, with no significant pathological history, presenting to the Department of Pediatric Emergency one week after eruption. Dermatological examination showed red and painful swollen right leg and multiple erythematous plaques surmounted by meliceric crusts surrounding the raised, well-defined, erythematous, oedematous lesions. In both patients, metaphyseal osteomyelitis was initially suspected, then excluded by standard x-ray of the leg which was normal in both patients. Erysipelas associated with impetigo was then suspected and finally deep thrombophlebitis. This diagnosis was excluded based on vascular Doppler ultrasound. This showed significant soft tissue infiltration in the right leg, without underlying collection. Laboratory test revealed high level of CRP and hyperleukocytosis, which confirmed our diagnosis of erysipelas. Both patients responded well to oral antibiotic therapy based on protective amoxicillin 50 mg/kg/day for 15 days with good outcome.

 

 

Figure 1: red and warm swelling of the right leg of the first child (A, B) and the second child (C) with an adjacent impetigo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Images in clinical medicine

Erysipelas complicating impetigo

Images in clinical medicine

Erysipelas complicating impetigo

Images in clinical medicine

Erysipelas complicating impetigo

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Key words

Erysipelas

Impetigo

Children

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