Original article | Volume 17, Article 61, 26 Jan 2014 | 10.11604/pamj.2014.17.61.3368

Unusual actinomycosis of the chest wall

Mouna Bouaddi, Badredine Hassam

Corresponding author: Mouna Bouaddi, Department of Dermatology and Venereology, university of Medicine, University Mohammed V Souissi, Rabat, Morocco

Received: 11 Sep 2013 - Accepted: 18 Sep 2013 - Published: 26 Jan 2014

Domain: Clinical medicine

Keywords: Actinomycosis, chest wall, granulomatous infection

©Mouna Bouaddi et al. Pan African Medical Journal (ISSN: 1937-8688). This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution International 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Cite this article: Mouna Bouaddi et al. Unusual actinomycosis of the chest wall. Pan African Medical Journal. 2014;17:61. [doi: 10.11604/pamj.2014.17.61.3368]

Available online at: https://www.panafrican-med-journal.com/content/article/17/61/full

Home | Volume 17 | Article number 61

Original article

Unusual actinomycosis of the chest wall

Unusual actinomycosis of the chest wall

 

Mouna Bouaddi1,&, Badredine Hassam1

 

1Department of Dermatology and Venereology, university of Medicine, University Mohammed V Souissi, Rabat, Morocco

 

 

&Corresponding author
Mouna Bouaddi, Department of Dermatology and Venereology, university of Medicine, University Mohammed V Souissi, Rabat, Morocco

 

 

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Actinomycosis is a chronic infection due to anaerobic filamentous bacteria (Actinomyces), which occurs mostly in the cervicofacial region as a chronic granulomatous infection. We report the case of Mr KI, 17 years old, without past medical history, presented a painful ulceration on the right side of the chest wall which evolved since 2 months. The onset of symptoms was a nodule which ulcerated after 2 months with extruding yellowish pus. The examination objectified ulcerated and burgeoning lesion in right parasternal region from what came yellowish pus mixed with sulphur granule (A). A painful subcutaneous nodule was noted under the right breast. An examination of the oral mucosa was entirely normal as well as the rest of the physical examination. Histopathologic studies (hematoxylin-eosin staining) revealed the presence of inflammatory cells surrounding basophilic sulfur granules which were composed of a large number of filaments arranged in a radiating pattern (B). The chest x-ray was normal. The chest scan showed an infiltration of the anterior and right lateral wall without bone and lung injury. The results of aerobic and anaerobic culture showed mixed flora. The histopathologic findings led to the diagnosis of actinomycosis of the wall chest. Treatment was based on oral amoxicillin + clavulanic acid (1g+125 mg 3 times daily). The size of the ulcerative lesion gradually decreased and completely healed by 4 weeks. Then antibiotherapy was continued for four months. No evidence of recurrence of this lesion was found after 24-month of follow-up.

Figure 1: A) ulcerated and burgeoning lesion in right parasternal region from what came yellowish pus mixed with sulphur granule; B)presence of inflammatory cells surrounding basophilic sulfur granules which were composed of a large number of filaments arranged in a radiating pattern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Original article

Unusual actinomycosis of the chest wall

Original article

Unusual actinomycosis of the chest wall

Original article

Unusual actinomycosis of the chest wall

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Key words

Actinomycosis

Chest wall

Granulomatous infection

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Unusual actinomycosis of the chest wall