Squamous cell carcinoma in a giant bladder diverticulum
Yassine El Abiad, Fouad Bakloul
The Pan African Medical Journal. 2015;20:378. doi:10.11604/pamj.2015.20.378.6765

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Squamous cell carcinoma in a giant bladder diverticulum

Cite this: The Pan African Medical Journal. 2015;20:378. doi:10.11604/pamj.2015.20.378.6765

Received: 07/04/2015 - Accepted: 14/04/2015 - Published: 16/04/2015

Key words: Squamous cell carcinoma, bladder diverticulum, surgery

© Yassine El Abiad et al. The Pan African Medical Journal - ISSN 1937-8688. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Available online at: http://www.panafrican-med-journal.com/content/article/20/378/full

Corresponding author: Yassine El Abiad, My Ismail Military Hospital, Meknes, Morocco (yassineelabiad@gmail.com)


Squamous cell carcinoma in a giant bladder diverticulum

 

Yassine El Abiad1,&, Fouad Bakloul2

 

1My Ismail Military Hospital, Meknes, Morocco, 2Avicenne Teaching Hospital, Rabat, Morroco

 

 

&Corresponding author
Yassine El Abiad, My Ismail Military Hospital, Meknes, Morocco

 

 

Image in medicine

A 65-year-old man with a history of recurrent urinary tract infections presented after a 3-months of visible hematuria. Physical and laboratory examinations revealed anemia and impaired renal function. Ultrasound and magnetic resonnance imaging (MRI) showed an invasive bladder tumor developing in a large posterior diverticulum (A and B) with rectal deviation (A) and responsible of a left hydronephrosis. First, the patient underwent a blood transfusion and a left percutaneous nephrostomy. Two weeks later, we perfomed a cystoscopy and a transurethral resection of the tumor. Pathology revealed a locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (stage > p T2). The patient had no history of bilharziasis. Since the surgical extirpation was not possible, the patient was treated with chemoradiotherapy, but died 6 months later. Non-bilharzial SCC represents < 5% of vesical tumors, it is caused by chronic irritation of the urothelium and often diagnosed at an advanced stage. The intradiveticular location account for approximately 1% of all bladder tumors and make the prognosis poorer due to lack of muscle barrier. This case combine these two rares conditions.

 

 

Figure 1: squamous cell carcinoma in a giant bladder diveticulum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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ISSN: 1937-8688. © 2017 - Pan African Medical Journal. All rights reserved