Recurrent testicular torsion after orchidopexy
Kostas Chondros, Nikolaos Chondros
The Pan African Medical Journal. 2015;20:190. doi:10.11604/pamj.2015.20.190.6417

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Recurrent testicular torsion after orchidopexy

Cite this: The Pan African Medical Journal. 2015;20:190. doi:10.11604/pamj.2015.20.190.6417

Received: 23/02/2015 - Accepted: 01/03/2015 - Published: 02/03/2015

Key words: Torsion, orchidopexy, testicle, subdartos pouch

© Kostas Chondros et al. The Pan African Medical Journal - ISSN 1937-8688. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Available online at: http://www.panafrican-med-journal.com/content/article/20/190/full

Corresponding author: Kostas Chondros, Department of Urology, University General Hospital of Heraklion, Heraklion, Crete, Greece (k.chondros@med.uoc.gr)


Recurrent testicular torsion after orchidopexy

 

Kostas Chondros1,&, Nikolaos Chondros1

 

1Department of Urology, University General Hospital of Heraklion, Heraklion, Crete, Greece

 

 

&Corresponding author
Kostas Chondros, Department of Urology, University General Hospital of Heraklion, Heraklion, Crete, Greece

 

 

Image in medicine

A 16-year-old male presented with a sudden, severe right scrotal pain at rest, occurred within the last 2 hours. The patient had a history of right orchidopexy 12 months ago. There was no associated fever, injury, or sports activity. Clinical examination and color-Doppler ultrasound confirmed the diagnosis of testicular torsion, with the absence of intraparenchymal blood flow. The patient was submitted to emergent scrotal exploration, and a 360-degree spermatic cord intravaginal torsion was confirmed intraoperativelly (A). After detorsion and worm pad instillation to the testis, color improvement was observed and organ retention was decided. In addition, two small scars in the anterior area of the testicle were observed (B), suggesting previous orchidopexy with failure of absorbable suture fixation. Finally, orchidopexy with subdartos pouch was performed in order to secure the ipsilateral testicle and classical contralateral orchidopexy for metachronous torsion prevention. In conclusion, recurrent testicular torsion after previous surgical treatment failure is rather uncommon and clinical alertness is mandatory.

 

 

Figure 1: intraoperative image of emergent scrotal exploration. A) Confirmation of testicular torsion B) Scars of previous orchidopexy sutures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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