Lichen planus pigmentosus
Hayat Bourra, Benzekri Leila
The Pan African Medical Journal. 2013;15:54. doi:10.11604/pamj.2013.15.54.2928

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Lichen planus pigmentosus

Cite this: The Pan African Medical Journal. 2013;15:54. doi:10.11604/pamj.2013.15.54.2928

Received: 08/06/2013 - Accepted: 18/06/2013 - Published: 19/06/2013

Key words: Lichen planus, lichen pigmentosus

© Hayat Bourra et al. The Pan African Medical Journal - ISSN 1937-8688. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Available online at: http://www.panafrican-med-journal.com/content/article/15/54/full

Corresponding author: Hayat Bourra, Dermatology Department, CHU Ibn Sina, Med V Souissi University, Rabat, Morocco (dr_hbourra@hotmail.com)


Lichen planus pigmentosus

 

Hayat Bourra1,&, Benzekri Leila1

 

1Dermatology Department, CHU Ibn Sina, Med V Souissi University, Rabat, Morocco

 

 

&Corresponding author
Hayat Bourra, Dermatology Department, CHU Ibn Sina, Med V Souissi University, Rabat, Morocco

 

 

Image in medicine

Lichen planus pigmentosus (LPP) is a rare variant of lichen planus (LP), reported in various ethnic groups. It occurs predominantly in female in the third or fourth decade of life, characterized by insidious onset of dark-brown macules in sun exposed areas and flexural folds. The differential diagnosis may occur with drug-induced pigmentation, photosensitization and vitamin deficiency like pellagra. Here we describe a case of a 51-year-old Moroccan man, working as a gardener, who presented an asymptomatic, non itching pigmented lesion on his face and neck. He had no history of trauma or medication use, and no preceding erythema or scaly skin eruption. Clinical examination revealed dark brown macules confluent at the forehead, preauricular region and temples with some papules in the neck. Oral, genital mucosa and nails were unaffected. A skin biopsy showed a lichenoide lymphohistiocytic infiltrate in the dermis with basal cell degeneration, pigmentary incontinence and dermal melanophages. The diagnosis of (LPP) was established. A hepatitis serology profile was negative. Initially, a chloroquine treatment was done but showed poor response.

Figure 1: Dark brownish macules and papules of the neck

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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ISSN: 1937-8688. © 2017 - Pan African Medical Journal. All rights reserved