A rare congenital malformation: caudal regression syndrome
Cherkaoui Mandour, Brahim El Mostarchid
The Pan African Medical Journal. 2013;14:30. doi:10.11604/pamj.2013.14.30.2364

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A rare congenital malformation: caudal regression syndrome

Cite this: The Pan African Medical Journal. 2013;14:30. doi:10.11604/pamj.2013.14.30.2364

Received: 09/01/2013 - Accepted: 14/01/2013 - Published: 21/01/2013

Key words: Caudal regression syndrome, congenital malformation, syringomyelia, vertebral agenesis

© Cherkaoui Mandour et al. The Pan African Medical Journal - ISSN 1937-8688. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Available online at: http://www.panafrican-med-journal.com/content/article/14/30/full

Corresponding author: Cherkaoui Mandour, Departement Of Neurosurgery, Military Hospital Mohammed V, Rabat, Morocco (mandour1978@hotmail.com)


A rare congenital malformation: caudal regression syndrome

 

Cherkaoui Mandour1,&, Brahim El Mostarchid1

 

1Departement Of Neurosurgery, Military Hospital Mohammed V, Rabat, Morocco

 

 

&Corresponding author
Cherkaoui Mandour, Departement Of Neurosurgery, Military Hospital Mohammed V, Rabat, Morocco

 

 

Image in medicine

Caudal regression is a rare syndrome which has a spectrum of congenital malformations ranging from simple anal atresia to absence of sacral, lumbar and possibly lower thoracic vertebrae. It results from a disturbance in the fetal mesoderm in early pregnancy (< 4th week of gestation). Maternal diabetes, genetic predisposition and vascular hypoperfusion have been suggested as possible causative factors but no true causative factor has been determined. Associated organ system dysfunction depends on the severity of the disease. Prenatal ultrasonographic diagnosis of this syndrome is possible at 22 weeks of gestation. We report a case of a four months old male newborn to a known diabetic mother.

 

Figure 1: Bone reconstruction in 3D that shows a syringomyelia from D4 to D7; terminal myelocystocele (D10); agenesis of D11, D12, lumbar vertebrae, sacrum and coccyx; contiguous appearance of kidneys without prevertebral parenchymal bridge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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