Investigating a paralytic shellfish poisoning in Gando Village, Wete District, Tanzania, July 2015
Loveness John Urio, Joseph Asamoah Frimpong, Innocent Semali, Rogath Saika Kishimba, Janneth Maridadi Mghamba, Ahmed Abade, Senga Sembuche, Nsiande Lema, Asha Khamis Ussi
The Pan African Medical Journal. 2018;30 (Supp 1):7. doi:10.11604/pamj.supp.2018.30.1.15265

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Supplement article

Case study

Investigating a paralytic shellfish poisoning in Gando Village, Wete District, Tanzania, July 2015

Cite this: The Pan African Medical Journal. 2018;30 (Supp 1):7. doi:10.11604/pamj.supp.2018.30.1.15265

Received: 21/02/2018 - Accepted: 27/03/2018 - Published: 17/05/2018

Key words: Outbreak investigation, paralytic shellfish, poisoning, Tanzania

© Loveness John Urio et al. The Pan African Medical Journal - ISSN 1937-8688. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Available online at: http://www.panafrican-med-journal.com/content/series/30/1/7/full

Corresponding author: Loveness John Urio, Tanzania Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program, Tanzania (loveness13us@yahoo.com)

This article is published as part of the supplement “African Case Studies for Public Health Volume 2” sponsored by African Field Epidemiology Network, (Case Study Design and Development, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University

Guest editors: Scott JN McNabb, Ghada N Farhat, Casey Daniel Hall, Joseph Asamoah Frimpong, Richard Dicker


Investigating a paralytic shellfish poisoning in Gando Village, Wete District, Tanzania, July 2015

Loveness John Urio1,&, Joseph Asamoah Frimpong2, Innocent Semali3, Rogath Saika Kishimba1, Janneth Maridadi Mghamba1, Ahmed Abade1, Senga Sembuche1, Nsiande Lema1, Asha Khamis Ussi1

 

1Tanzania Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program, Tanzania, 2African Field Epidemiology Network, Accra, Ghana, 3Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Tanzania

 

 

&Corresponding author
Loveness John Urio, Tanzania Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program, Tanzania

 

 

Abstract

The investigation of foodborne outbreaks requires a multi-disciplinary set of skills. Frequently, foodborne-related outbreaks are poorly investigated due to lack of all required skills on the part of the investigators. This case study, based on a shellfish poisoning outbreak investigation conducted in Wete, Zanzibar in July 2015 by the Tanzania Field Epidemiology Training Program (TFETP), seeks to reinforce principles and skills in foodborne outbreak investigation. It is primarily intended for training public health practitioners in a classroom setting. Facilitating this case study should take approximately 3 hours.

 

 

How to use this case study    Down

General instructions: ideally, 1 to 2 instructors facilitate the case study for 10 to 20 students in a classroom or conference room. The instructor should direct participants to read a paragraph out loud, going around the room to give each participant a chance to read. When the participant reads a question, the instructor directs all participants to perform calculations, construct graphs, or engage in discussions. The instructor may split the class to play different roles or take different sides in answering a question. As a result, participants learn from each other, not just from the instructors. Specific instructor’s notes are included with each question in the instructor’s version of this case study.

 

Audience: residents in Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programs (FELTPs), and others who are interested in this topic.

 

Prerequisites: before using this case study, case study participants should have received training in basic biostatistics in epidemiology, public health surveillance, and advanced epidemiology and outbreak investigation and response.

 

Materials needed: laptop with Microsoft Excel or graph paper, Epi info software, flipchart or white board with markers.

 

Level of training and associated public health activity: intermediate outbreak investigation

 

Time required: 3 hours

 

Language: English

 

 

Case study material Up    Down

 

 

Competing interests Up    Down

The authors declare no competing interest.

 

 

Acknowledgments Up    Down

We wish to acknowledge the Tanzania Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Programme, Ministry of Health Zanzibar, Wete Health Management Team for their participation and assistance in this investigation. In addition, we thank the leaders of Gando shehia for their cooperation.

 

 

References Up    Down

  1. 2002 Population and Housing Census General Report: North Pemba: Wete. Archived from the original on 18 June 2004. Accessed on 21 February 2018.

  2. CDC. Section 2: Steps of an Outbreak Investigation. In Principles of Epidemiology in Public Health Practice, 3rd ed. Atlanta, GA. 2012. Google Scholar

  3. Wikipedia. Wete District. Accessed on 21 February 2018.

  4. Funari E, Testai E. Human health risk assessment related to cyanotoxins exposure. Crit Rev Toxicol. 2008; 38(2): 97-125. PubMed | Google Scholar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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