From known to the unknown: investigating an unusual outbreak of viral exanthema in a secondary school in Abeokuta, Nigeria, 2015
Magbagbeola David Dairo, Oluwaseun Ebenezer Oladeinde, Akinyode Oluyomi Bamiselu, Patrick Nguku, Joseph Asamoah Frimpong, Meeyoung Mattie Park
The Pan African Medical Journal. 2018;30 (Supp 1):6. doi:10.11604/pamj.supp.2018.30.1.15264

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Supplement article

Case study

From known to the unknown: investigating an unusual outbreak of viral exanthema in a secondary school in Abeokuta, Nigeria, 2015

Cite this: The Pan African Medical Journal. 2018;30 (Supp 1):6. doi:10.11604/pamj.supp.2018.30.1.15264

Received: 21/02/2018 - Accepted: 27/03/2018 - Published: 16/05/2018

Key words: Outbreak investigation, viral, exanthema, Nigeria

© Magbagbeola David Dairo et al. The Pan African Medical Journal - ISSN 1937-8688. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Available online at: http://www.panafrican-med-journal.com/content/series/30/1/6/full

Corresponding author: Magbagbeola David Dairo, Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria (drdairo@yahoo.com)

This article is published as part of the supplement “African Case Studies for Public Health Volume 2” sponsored by African Field Epidemiology Network, (Case Study Design and Development, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University

Guest editors: Scott JN McNabb, Ghada N Farhat, Casey Daniel Hall, Joseph Asamoah Frimpong, Richard Dicker


From known to the unknown: investigating an unusual outbreak of viral exanthema in a secondary school in Abeokuta, Nigeria, 2015

Magbagbeola David Dairo1,2,&, Oluwaseun Ebenezer Oladeinde1,3, Akinyode Oluyomi Bamiselu3, Patrick Nguku1, Joseph Asamoah Frimpong4, Meeyoung Mattie Park5

 

1Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Nigeria, 2Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria, 3Ministry of Health Ogun State, Nigeria, 4African Field Epidemiology Network, Accra, Ghana, 5Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, USA

 

 

&Corresponding author
Magbagbeola David Dairo, Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

 

 

Abstract

Investigating an outbreak of disease requires mastery of a set of skills and collaboration among different cadres of health workers. Although you want to focus on a specific disease, you need to keep your mind open to possibilities. This case study is based on investigation of an outbreak of rashes suspected to be measles but which proved to be otherwise. It reinforces the knowledge of the steps in outbreak investigation which should have been covered in classroom lecture or background reading. This case study is best suited for basic level of training in field epidemiology and can be completed within 2-3 hours.

 

 

How to use this case study    Down

General instructions: this case study is to be used in a classroom setting for 12-20 participants.

 

Audience: residents at the basic/frontline level in Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programmes, trainees in the epidemiology course in the general public health training programmes, medical officers of health of the local government area and state surveillance officers and other health workers involved in outbreak investigations.

 

Prerequisites: participants should have prior lectures in outbreak investigation. Participants should also have basic knowledge of rates, ratio and frequencies.

 

Materials needed: laptops with Microsoft Excel (or graph paper, and pencil), white board or flip charts with markers.

 

Level of training and associated public health activity: Novice – outbreak investigation

 

Time required: 2-3 hours

 

Language: English

 

 

Case study material Up    Down

 

 

Competing interests Up    Down

The authors declare no competing interest.

 

 

Acknowledgments Up    Down

We wish to acknowledge the Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme (NFELTP) and the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET). The authors acknowledge also the contributions of the staff and students of the secondary school where this event occurred and the staff of the Ogun State Ministry of Health for their participation on this investigation. All names used in the story are fictitious and do not refer to any individual.

 

 

References Up    Down

  1. World Atlas. Map of Abeokuta in Ogun, Nigeria. Accessed on 21 February 2018.

  2. Lambert N, Strebel P, Orenstein W, Icenogle J, Poland GA. Rubella. Lancet. 2015 Jun 6; 385(9984): 2297-307. PubMed | Google Scholar

  3. Vynnycky E, Adams EJ, Cutts FT et al. Using Seroprevalence and Immunisation Coverage Data to Estimate the Global Burden of Congenital Rubella Syndrome, 1996-2010: A Systematic Review. PLoS One. 2016 Mar 10; 11(3): e0149160. PubMed | Google Scholar

  4. Olajide OM, Aminu M, Randawa AJ, Adejo DS. Seroprevalence of rubella-specific IgM and IgG antibodies among pregnant women seen in a tertiary hospital in Nigeria. International Journal of Women’s Health. 2015; 7: 75-83. Google Scholar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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