Overview of the design and development of public health case studies
Ghada N Farhat, Olivia Namusisi, Scott JN McNabb
The Pan African Medical Journal. 2017;27 (Supp 1):2. doi:10.11604/pamj.supp.2017.27.1.12887

Create an account  |  Sign in
Case studies in Public health Supplement 2 Supplement
"Better health through knowledge sharing and information dissemination "

Supplement article

Editorial

Overview of the design and development of public health case studies

Cite this: The Pan African Medical Journal. 2017;27 (Supp 1):2. doi:10.11604/pamj.supp.2017.27.1.12887

Received: 27/05/2017 - Accepted: 27/05/2017 - Published: 28/05/2017

Key words: Case study, applied epidemiology, public health competencies

© Ghada N Farhat et al. The Pan African Medical Journal - ISSN 1937-8688. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Available online at: http://www.panafrican-med-journal.com/content/series/27/1/2/full

Corresponding author: Ghada N Farhat, Emory University, Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA, USA (ghada.n.farhat@emory.edu)

This article is published as part of the supplement “African Case Studies in Public Heath” sponsored by Emory University, African Field Epidemiology Network

Guest editors: Olivia Namusisi, Scott JN McNabb, Ghada N Farhat, Joseph Asamoah Frimpong


Overview of the design and development of public health case studies

Ghada N Farhat1,&, Olivia Namusisi2, Scott JN McNabb1

 

1Emory University, Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA, USA, 2African Field Epidemiology Network, Kampala, Uganda

 

 

&Corresponding author
Ghada N Farhat, Emory University, Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA, USA

 

 

Editorial

Case studies are an effective tool for simulating real-life public health functions and services [1] in public health training programs. These problem-based learning exercises are enriching and informative to trainees to the extent that they are rooted in the local context and based on country-specific data. In Africa, public health curricula have relied on United States-specific exercises owing to the dearth of analogous examples tailored to African contexts. This supplement introduces 11 new case study exercises based on real events in African contexts and written by experienced Africa-based public health trainers and practitioners. These case studies represent the most up-to-date and context-appropriate case study exercises for African public health training programs. These exercises are designed to reinforce and instil competencies for addressing health threats in the future leaders of public health in Africa. Developing context-specific and culturally tailored case studies has been hampered by the lack of a comprehensive, systematic approach to guide this process. To offset this gap, the Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University – in close collaboration with the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET) – developed a training curriculum and implementation plan for the design and development of locally relevant, country-specific public health case studies.

The newly developed methodology – to be published soon – distills best practices and provides a comprehensive, step-by-step approach to case study development. The methodology was piloted in a 2-week course in August 2015 (Case Study Design and Development Course [2] ) delivered to public health professionals and educators from various African universities and Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programs (FELTPs), as well as the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The course, conducted at Emory University, used didactic and hands-on training to develop competency in case study design and development and other pedagogical skills. It guided participants through this step-by-step approach culminating in thoughtful, detailed, locally relevant, culturally tailored, country-specific case studies; they are published here. Course participants facilitated their draft case studies in class and received peer feedback on content and delivery. By the end of the course, participants produced revised case studies ready for use in African FELTPs and public health training programs.

Three cohorts have been trained so far in 2015, 2016, and 2017. A total of 42 participants representing 12 African countries, as well as three participants from the U.S. CDC developed a diverse set of 29 case studies. The inaugural cohort in 2015 produced the 11 case studies published in this special issue of the Pan African Medical Journal. Plans to publish those of the second (2016) and third (2017) cohorts are underway. These case studies and future ones will be accessible by FELTPs across Africa and the world. We trust they will help the next generation of African disease detectives.

 

 

Competing interests    Down

The authors declare no competing interest.

 

 

Acknowledgments Up    Down

This initiative was funded by AFENET. We acknowledge with gratitude the contribution and dedication of the Emory University team (Meeyoung Park, Casey Hall and Sorie Dumbuya) and the AFENET team (Dr. Kenneth Offosu Barko) who made this work possible.

 

 

References Up    Down

  1. Case Study Design and Development Course. Access 27 May 2017.

  2. The 10 Essential Public Health Services. Access 27 May 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The Pan African Medical Journal articles are archived on Pubmed Central. Access PAMJ archives on PMC here

Current:

Volume 28 (September - December 2017)

Article tools

Rate this article

Altmetric

PAMJ is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics

PAMJ is published in collaboration with the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET)
Currently tracked by: DOAJ, AIM, Google Scholar, AJOL, EBSCO, Scopus, Embase, IC, HINARI, Global Health, PubMed Central, PubMed/Medline, Ulrichsweb, More to come . Member of COPE.

ISSN: 1937-8688. © 2017 - Pan African Medical Journal. All rights reserved